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Getting Around: When the Car-Free Become the Car-Full —

When Tim Nevits gave up being car-free and bought a car, his family rejoiced.

“I’m eccentric enough as it is,” says the fortysomething, stray-cat-adopting, tiny-house-dwelling computer programmer. “To them it was like I was coming back into the fold from one of my more eccentric indulgences.”

He’d been living without a car for two and a half years by then. Two and a half years of riding buses and trains — and, every once in a while, his push scooter. Two and a half years of puzzled or worried looks from friends and family, who’d often try to force car rides on him despite his assurances that he was fine taking transit.

For Nevits, though, it was all worthwhile. He’d grown up in Northeast Ohio but spent 10 years living in New York City, an experience that made him a diehard transit devotee.

“To me, taking transit is just a more forward, community-minded way of thinking,” he says. “That’s one of the things I love about New York: You have people from all economic strata who see each other every day because everyone takes the train. You’re all in it together.”

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